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Album Review

Positive Elements

Spiritual Content

Sexual Content

Violent Content

Crude or Profane Language

Drug and Alcohol Content

Other Negative Elements

Conclusion

Pro-social Content

A cautionary tale, "Lacquer Head" describes the consequences of sniffing household chemicals to get high. Lead singer Les Claypool rejects the pretentiousness of TV ("Antipop") and claims to be a faithful friend ("Dirty Drowning Man"). Alcohol, violent movies and pornography are viewed as potentially harmful on "Natural Joe," but . . .

Objectionable Content

"Natural Joe"--among other songs--is poisoned by profanity. After searching for comfort in a bottle of Jim Beam, a deeply depressed man escapes his pain through suicide ("He let himself out with two barrels of steel"). On the spoken intro to "Power Man," a man says he'd wear women's underwear if called upon to do so. The artist consumes "a diet of black coffee and Prozac buttered toast"("Mama Didn't Raise No Fool") and claims, "I like to taunt/I like to tease/I'll bring your psyche to its knees" ("Eclectic Electric"). With help from Rage Against the Machine, Primus seems to portray our government as oppressive and tyrannical ("Electric Uncle Sam").

Summary Advisory

This is the band that scored a novelty hit in 1995 with the sexually charged music video "Wynona's Big Brown Beaver." Nothing that offensive here, but warnings about addictive habits can't save Antipop from its own dependencies. Profane speech. Bitterness toward authority. Ambiguous references to suicide and cross-dressing. Skip it.

Plot Summary

Christian Beliefs

Other Belief Systems

Authority Roles

Profanity/Violence

Kissing/Sex/Homosexuality

Discussion Topics

Additional Comments/Notes

Credits

Rating

Readability Age Range

Genre

Rock

Author

Cast

Director

Distributor

Network

Performance

Landed at 44 its first week on the charts.

Record Label

Platform

Publisher

Released

On Video

Year Published

Awards