Album Review

Positive Elements

Spiritual Content

Sexual Content

Violent Content

Crude or Profane Language

Drug and Alcohol Content

Other Negative Elements

Conclusion

Pro-social Content

A single mom past her dating prime is valued on “Maybe Katie.” The need to have a precious-metal soul and not just a showy exterior is the focus of “Aluminum.” A guy in love, yet plagued by irrational doubt, asks his woman to be patient on the country-flavored “For You.” “Upside Down” finds the singer sick of fame and the complications it brings to romance. Upon learning that his girl is two-timing him, a man resists the temptation to fight the other guy (“Take It Outside”). With tongue planted in cheek, the band tweaks unbridled consumerism by prescribing “Shopping” as the cure for life’s problems. Still ...

Objectionable Content

Some listeners may not get the joke. Beyond its possible nod to reincarnation, “Next Time” views regrets such as failing to kiss a girl as serious sins of omission. How “War on Drugs” ultimately feels about suicide is unclear, but its descriptions of it could paint a dangerously romantic picture for someone considering it. That track also includes the hopeless line, “They say that Jesus and mental health/Are just for those who can help themselves.” Liner art includes female breast nudity. “Celebrity” is marred by a crass sexual reference.

Summary Advisory

Most of Everything’s 15 cuts are innocuous, nonsensical or both. But there’s no getting around a few issues, most notably an ambiguous song about suicide that dismisses Christ as unhelpful to hurting souls.

Plot Summary

Christian Beliefs

Other Belief Systems

Authority Roles

Profanity/Violence

Kissing/Sex/Homosexuality

Discussion Topics

Additional Comments/Notes

Credits

Rating

Readability Age Range

Author

Cast

Director

Distributor

Network

Performance

Top-10 pop disc

Record Label

Reprise

Platform

Publisher

Released

On Video

Year Published

Awards