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TV Series Review

In one episode of NBC's inside-baseball sitcom 30 Rock, Jack Donaghy barrels into NBC's "standards department" and announces that the network can no longer use the words "hit," "great show," "fun" or "broadcast television." The line's a dig at the broadcast networks, all of whom have fallen on hard times, and particularly NBC, whose fall has been longer and harder than most. And it encapsulates 30 Rock's very quirky, often self-deprecating humor.

But it made me wonder, Would 30 Rock itself qualify as a "hit"? Hardly. Despite NBC's best efforts, it's never really been "Must-See TV." It follows the exploits of Liz Lemon, head writer for the fictional TGS With Tracy Jordan, a Saturday Night Live-style sketch show staffed with oddball writers, cranky producers, daftly insecure stars and a meddling boss, named Jack. The show is based on star Tina Fey's own experiences as a writer for SNL—but it seems that most folks give it a shrug before looking for a  Two and a Half Men rerun.

Is it a "great show"? The industry would say so. 30 Rock was an Emmy juggernaut in the late aughts, earning back-to-back-to-back honors for best series in 2007, '08 and '09. It propelled Fey's co-star and foil Alec Baldwin to a phenomenal career resurgence (and helped inoculate him from the fallout caused by a series of personal missteps, including a profane message to his daughter in which he called her a "little pig"). It's helped make Fey the era's comedic "it" girl—earning her a bevy of acting and writing awards and drawing comparisons to the legendary Mary Tyler Moore. Rarely, it seems, has a show been talked about by so many and seen by so few.

Is it "fun"? Well, that depends on who you ask. Obviously the critics love it. Families? Maybe not so much. The show is fun-ny, no question. But the content is almost always questionable: Nothing's off limits, from alcoholism to pedophilia, from suicide to Jack's eclectic sex life. Using her low-brow SNL background as a crutch, Fey alternates between sharp one-liners and crude cracks about masturbation, strippers, porn, penis size, lesbianism, threesomes and orgasms. There's a lot of cleavage shown, and some episodes feature a pretty young secretary whose skimpy outfits and provocative poses send male co-workers into a stupor. Drunken binges, religious mockery and mild profanity complicate matters further, putting comedy-starved viewers between, heh-heh, a Rock and a hard place. It's the sort of humor that 20 years ago you'd only find on cable.

One final question: Is 30 Rock on "broadcast television"? Why, yes. Yes it is.

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Positive Elements

Spiritual Content

Sexual Content

Violent Content

Crude or Profane Language

Drug and Alcohol Content

Other Negative Elements

Conclusion

Pro-social Content

Objectionable Content

Summary Advisory

Plot Summary

Christian Beliefs

Other Belief Systems

Authority Roles

Profanity/Violence

Kissing/Sex/Homosexuality

Discussion Topics

Additional Comments/Notes

Episode Reviews

30Rock: 3-1-2012

Credits

Rating

Readability Age Range

Genre

Comedy

Author

Cast

Tina Fey as Liz Lemon; Tracy Morgan as Tracy Jordan; Jane Krakowski as Jenna Maroney; Jack McBrayer as Kenneth Parcell; Scott Adsit as Pete Hornberger; Judah Friedlander as Frank Rossitano; Alec Baldwin as Jack Donaghy

Director

Distributor

Network

NBC

Performance

Record Label

Platform

Publisher

Released

On Video

Year Published

Awards

Reviewer

Paul Asay

We hope this review was both interesting and useful. Please share it with family and friends who would benefit from it as well.

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